Session

Swifty Session 2: Command & Data Handling

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

Modern satellite complexity is increasing, thus requiring bespoke and expensive on-board solutions to provide a Failure Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) function. Although FDIR is vital in ensuring the safety, autonomy, and availability of satellite systems in flight, there is a clear need in the space industry for a more adaptable, scalable, and cost-effective solution. This paper explores the current state of the art for Machine Learning error detection and prognostic algorithms utilized by both the space sector and the commercial sector. Although work has previously been done in the commercial sector on error detection and prognostics, most commercial applications are not nearly as limited by the power, mass, and radiation tolerance constraints as for operation in a space environment. Therefore, this paper also discusses several Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) multi-core micro-processors, small-footprint boards that will be explored as possible testbeds for future integration into a satellite in-orbit demonstrator.

Available for download on Saturday, August 07, 2021

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Aug 7th, 12:00 AM

Low-Power Boards Enabling ML-Based Approaches to FDIR in Space-Based Applications

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Modern satellite complexity is increasing, thus requiring bespoke and expensive on-board solutions to provide a Failure Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) function. Although FDIR is vital in ensuring the safety, autonomy, and availability of satellite systems in flight, there is a clear need in the space industry for a more adaptable, scalable, and cost-effective solution. This paper explores the current state of the art for Machine Learning error detection and prognostic algorithms utilized by both the space sector and the commercial sector. Although work has previously been done in the commercial sector on error detection and prognostics, most commercial applications are not nearly as limited by the power, mass, and radiation tolerance constraints as for operation in a space environment. Therefore, this paper also discusses several Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) multi-core micro-processors, small-footprint boards that will be explored as possible testbeds for future integration into a satellite in-orbit demonstrator.