Presenter Information

Charlene Jacka, Air Force Research LaboratoryFollow
Sennen Peña, Space Dynamics LaboratoryFollow
Richard C. Ordonez, Naval Information Warfare Center PacificFollow
David Lingard, Defence Science & Technology GroupFollow
David Neudegg, Defence Science & Technology GroupFollow
Victor Stamatescu, Defence Science & Technology GroupFollow
Michele Wilson, Defence Science & Technology GroupFollow
Pierre Lamontagne, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) OttawaFollow
Sacha Nandlall, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) OttawaFollow
Jeff Secker, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) OttawaFollow
Ted Parkinson, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) OttawaFollow
Jean-Pierre Ardouin, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Robert Boucher, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Vivian Issa, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Daniel Lavigne, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Josée Lévesque, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Caroline Turcotte, DRDC R&D Canada (DRDC) ValcartierFollow
Frank Schaefer, Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed DynamicsFollow
Tobias R. Carman, Defence Science and Technology LaboratoryFollow
Avyaya Kolhatkar, Defence Science and Technology LaboratoryFollow
Sean Murphy, Defence Science and Technology LaboratoryFollow
Chiara Toglia, Thales Alenia Space ItalyFollow
J. Martin van de Pol, Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF)Follow
Mark van Persie, Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre NLRFollow
William Coldicutt, Defense Technology AgencyFollow
Øyvind Kinden Lensjø, Norwegian Defence Research EstablishmentFollow

Session

Technical Session 3: Year in Review

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

The Micro-Satellite Military Utility (MSMU) Project Arrangement (PA) is an agreement under the Responsive Space Capabilities (RSC) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that involves the Departments and Ministries of Defence of Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom and United States. MSMU’s charter is to inform a space enterprise that provides military users with reliable access to a broad spectrum of information in an opportunistic environment.

Research and Development teams from MSMU partner nations supported Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2020 which took place 17 to 31 August 2020 in the Hawaiian region. RIMPAC 2020 provided an opportunity to explore the military utility of a Hybrid Space Architecture (HSA) of satellites including traditional government and commercial satellites, as well as micro-satellites and nanosatellites, by leveraging contributions across the MSMU partner nations. The objective was to continue testing the hypothesis that an HSA, mostly composed of small satellites, can bring significant value to the operational theatre. The MSMU PA partner nations have leveraged several multi-national exercises, with the first being the Exercise RIMPAC 2018. Previous exercises enabled multinational technology advancements, interoperability testing, process refinement, and capability developments to make advancements towards MSMU’s goal to address the warfighter’s need for diverse ISR capabilities. The most recent accomplishment was a major integration effort across mission planning tools, space-based Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) data providers, and exploitation tools.

The MSMU team accessed ~256 space-based sensors (EO – Electro Optical, SAR – Synthetic Aperture Radar, AIS – Automatic Identification System) to collect maritime domain and ISR data over a harbor, airfields and open sea. Data was exploited via international channels in order to determine the success rate of capturing pertinent data to be later exploited and disseminated. This paper describes results from the experiment and offers insights into the HSA military utility.

Available for download on Saturday, August 07, 2021

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Aug 10th, 10:00 AM

Demonstration of a Hybrid Satellite Architecture During RIMPAC 2020

Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Micro-Satellite Military Utility (MSMU) Project Arrangement (PA) is an agreement under the Responsive Space Capabilities (RSC) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that involves the Departments and Ministries of Defence of Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom and United States. MSMU’s charter is to inform a space enterprise that provides military users with reliable access to a broad spectrum of information in an opportunistic environment.

Research and Development teams from MSMU partner nations supported Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2020 which took place 17 to 31 August 2020 in the Hawaiian region. RIMPAC 2020 provided an opportunity to explore the military utility of a Hybrid Space Architecture (HSA) of satellites including traditional government and commercial satellites, as well as micro-satellites and nanosatellites, by leveraging contributions across the MSMU partner nations. The objective was to continue testing the hypothesis that an HSA, mostly composed of small satellites, can bring significant value to the operational theatre. The MSMU PA partner nations have leveraged several multi-national exercises, with the first being the Exercise RIMPAC 2018. Previous exercises enabled multinational technology advancements, interoperability testing, process refinement, and capability developments to make advancements towards MSMU’s goal to address the warfighter’s need for diverse ISR capabilities. The most recent accomplishment was a major integration effort across mission planning tools, space-based Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) data providers, and exploitation tools.

The MSMU team accessed ~256 space-based sensors (EO – Electro Optical, SAR – Synthetic Aperture Radar, AIS – Automatic Identification System) to collect maritime domain and ISR data over a harbor, airfields and open sea. Data was exploited via international channels in order to determine the success rate of capturing pertinent data to be later exploited and disseminated. This paper describes results from the experiment and offers insights into the HSA military utility.