Presenter Information

Brent Horine, Hypergiant Industries

Session

Technical Poster Session 1: Ground Systems & Operations

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

With the proliferation of diverse small satellites in orbit, many connected via mesh networks, an opportunity exists to exploit fallow capabilities in satellites for which the original mission is complete or in a sustaining phase that requires less than 100% capacity. We outline a marketplace to facilitate matching of needs and capabilities via a multi-agent negotiation framework. Agents have knowledge of the capabilities, constraints, configuration and load on their represented satellite. This knowledge can be imperfect at least temporarily due to communication constraints. Exchanges of information during the negotiation in the form of arguments can improve overall knowledge. Argumentation in negotiation allows for non-monotonic reasoning which can find solutions that conventional cost-function search algorithms won't necessarily find. Ultimately, satellite owners can find additional sources of revenue for their space assets after or in addition to their original mission. Missions can find solutions in existing assets without having to spend the time and money to develop and launch purpose-built systems. The Argumentation and Multi-Agent approach leads to emergent behavior from combining satellites into coalitions. We present a framework to conduct these negotiations and discuss how proposals and arguments may be generated and accepted or rejected. Workloads are managed via containerization and orchestration technology. The overall system is constrained by the realities of space, especially limited band-width communications.

Available for download on Saturday, August 07, 2021

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Aug 7th, 12:00 AM

Creating a Marketplace for a Constellation as a Service

Utah State University, Logan, UT

With the proliferation of diverse small satellites in orbit, many connected via mesh networks, an opportunity exists to exploit fallow capabilities in satellites for which the original mission is complete or in a sustaining phase that requires less than 100% capacity. We outline a marketplace to facilitate matching of needs and capabilities via a multi-agent negotiation framework. Agents have knowledge of the capabilities, constraints, configuration and load on their represented satellite. This knowledge can be imperfect at least temporarily due to communication constraints. Exchanges of information during the negotiation in the form of arguments can improve overall knowledge. Argumentation in negotiation allows for non-monotonic reasoning which can find solutions that conventional cost-function search algorithms won't necessarily find. Ultimately, satellite owners can find additional sources of revenue for their space assets after or in addition to their original mission. Missions can find solutions in existing assets without having to spend the time and money to develop and launch purpose-built systems. The Argumentation and Multi-Agent approach leads to emergent behavior from combining satellites into coalitions. We present a framework to conduct these negotiations and discuss how proposals and arguments may be generated and accepted or rejected. Workloads are managed via containerization and orchestration technology. The overall system is constrained by the realities of space, especially limited band-width communications.