Session

Technical Poster Session 1: Student Poster Competition

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

This poster presents an update on the development of the Optical Periscopic Imager for Comets (OPIC) instrument [1], which will be hosted on one of three spacecraft making up the Comet Interceptor ESA-JAXA mission [2]. OPIC is a compact ( < 0.5 kg) monochromic camera for taking images of the nucleus and coma of either a long-period or dynamically new comet, or an interstellar object for mapping, reconstruction and localisation purposes. The camera will operate in a harsh environment with continuous dust impacts throughout its multi-day operation; therefore, the instrument is equipped with a periscope, which protects optics from high-velocity impacts. The probe is spin-stabilised at 4-15 RPM and will be parked in Lagrange point L2 (launched with ARIEL telescope) and depart at a suitable time to intercept a target at velocity 10-70 km/s. The closest approach is approximately 400 km.

Available for download on Saturday, August 07, 2021

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Aug 7th, 12:00 AM

Optical Periscopic Imager for Comets (OPIC) Instrument for the Planned Comet Interceptor Mission

Utah State University, Logan, UT

This poster presents an update on the development of the Optical Periscopic Imager for Comets (OPIC) instrument [1], which will be hosted on one of three spacecraft making up the Comet Interceptor ESA-JAXA mission [2]. OPIC is a compact ( < 0.5 kg) monochromic camera for taking images of the nucleus and coma of either a long-period or dynamically new comet, or an interstellar object for mapping, reconstruction and localisation purposes. The camera will operate in a harsh environment with continuous dust impacts throughout its multi-day operation; therefore, the instrument is equipped with a periscope, which protects optics from high-velocity impacts. The probe is spin-stabilised at 4-15 RPM and will be parked in Lagrange point L2 (launched with ARIEL telescope) and depart at a suitable time to intercept a target at velocity 10-70 km/s. The closest approach is approximately 400 km.