Location

Orbital ATK Conference Center

Start Date

5-7-2018 10:10 AM

Description

Performance improvements in turbopump systems pumping cold water have been obtained through implementation of a recirculation channel called a stability control device. However, many turbopump systems use liquid hydrogen as the working fluid. Additional thermodynamic effects present in liquid hydrogen at low temperatures (20 K) can limit cavitation formation and improve performance in liquid rocket turbopump systems. The performance benefits of an an inducer with and without an SCD using liquid hydrogen as the working fluid are considered here. Numerical simulations at both on and off design flow coefficients are performed to determine how the thermodynamic effects of cavitation at cryogenic temperatures affect SCD performance. Marginal head improvements are apparent with SCD implementation, but only at ~60% of the design flow coefficient. Additionally, a stabilizing effect with SCD utilization is observed at all considered flow coefficients and corresponds to a reduction in backflow caused by the SCD. The SCD widens the operating range of the inducer, as the inducer is able to operate stably at flow coefficients far below design.

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Session 1

Available for download on Tuesday, May 07, 2019

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May 7th, 10:10 AM

Cryogenic Cavitation Performance of an Axial Inducer with a Stability Control Device

Orbital ATK Conference Center

Performance improvements in turbopump systems pumping cold water have been obtained through implementation of a recirculation channel called a stability control device. However, many turbopump systems use liquid hydrogen as the working fluid. Additional thermodynamic effects present in liquid hydrogen at low temperatures (20 K) can limit cavitation formation and improve performance in liquid rocket turbopump systems. The performance benefits of an an inducer with and without an SCD using liquid hydrogen as the working fluid are considered here. Numerical simulations at both on and off design flow coefficients are performed to determine how the thermodynamic effects of cavitation at cryogenic temperatures affect SCD performance. Marginal head improvements are apparent with SCD implementation, but only at ~60% of the design flow coefficient. Additionally, a stabilizing effect with SCD utilization is observed at all considered flow coefficients and corresponds to a reduction in backflow caused by the SCD. The SCD widens the operating range of the inducer, as the inducer is able to operate stably at flow coefficients far below design.