Start Date

5-2020 12:00 AM

Description

High sensitivity of electrochemical sensors enables the detection of low concentrations of target analyte. Being able to quickly and accurately detect low concentrations of proteins at point-of-care allows for results to be analyzed more easily and effectively. Having high surface area allows for more analyte to be detected, possibly leading to increased sensitivity. Vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were patterned into interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) and then functionalized with the representative protein streptavidin to demonstrate sensing of biotin. Three electrode heights were investigated to determine the influence of electrode height on sensor sensitivity. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the electrodes and track the associated changes with the addition of streptavidin and biotin. A change in imaginary impedance at 147 Hz was shown to have the largest sensitivity. Height was shown to have a significant impact on sensor response, particularly at higher concentrations, with 80 μm tall VACNTs having 138% change in impedance when adding streptavidin and biotin.

Comments

Due to COVID-19, the Symposium was not able to be held this year. However, papers and posters were still submitted.

Available for download on Saturday, May 01, 2021

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 12:00 AM

Influence of Electrode Height on Carbon Nanotube Electrochemical Biosensors

High sensitivity of electrochemical sensors enables the detection of low concentrations of target analyte. Being able to quickly and accurately detect low concentrations of proteins at point-of-care allows for results to be analyzed more easily and effectively. Having high surface area allows for more analyte to be detected, possibly leading to increased sensitivity. Vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were patterned into interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) and then functionalized with the representative protein streptavidin to demonstrate sensing of biotin. Three electrode heights were investigated to determine the influence of electrode height on sensor sensitivity. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the electrodes and track the associated changes with the addition of streptavidin and biotin. A change in imaginary impedance at 147 Hz was shown to have the largest sensitivity. Height was shown to have a significant impact on sensor response, particularly at higher concentrations, with 80 μm tall VACNTs having 138% change in impedance when adding streptavidin and biotin.