Presenter Information

Lars Lofgren, University of Utah

Location

Virtual

Start Date

5-10-2021 9:15 AM

End Date

5-10-2021 9:25 AM

Description

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication associated with cardiac surgery. AKI is associated with increased hospital costs, hospital length of stay (LOS), and mortality risk. The current diagnostic criteria rely on serum creatinine measurements and urine output data. Serum creatinine is not renal specific. It is known that there are factors other than renal injury that influence serum creatine concentrations. Serum creatinine levels are measured as concentrations which means large changes in fluid balance may alter the serum creatinine concentration. Urine output is not a reliable measurement of renal injury, either. During surgery it is common to administer diuretics which influence urine output independent of renal damage. Neither of these measures are prognostic, which precludes the prevention of the injury. Thus, researchers are investigating novel biomarkers that are renal specific and can monitor AKI risk in real time. Some researchers are focused on identifying chemical biomarkers to diagnose AKI more effectively. However, their use is limited due to cost and time. Preliminary studies have also shown that urine oxygen concentration may be a physiological biomarker that can be used to monitor AKI risk in real time. Urine oxygen concentration may reflect tissue oxygen concentration in the medullary region of the kidney. This measurement is affected by oxygen exchange between urine and the urinary tract tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between urine flow rate and the performance of a novel device to monitor AKI risk in real time. The results from this study suggest that is possible to monitor oxygen concentration non-invasively and that as the urine flow rate increases the performance of the device improves.

Available for download on Tuesday, May 10, 2022

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May 10th, 9:15 AM May 10th, 9:25 AM

Monitoring Acute Kidney Injury Risk with Urine Oxygen Partial Pressure

Virtual

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication associated with cardiac surgery. AKI is associated with increased hospital costs, hospital length of stay (LOS), and mortality risk. The current diagnostic criteria rely on serum creatinine measurements and urine output data. Serum creatinine is not renal specific. It is known that there are factors other than renal injury that influence serum creatine concentrations. Serum creatinine levels are measured as concentrations which means large changes in fluid balance may alter the serum creatinine concentration. Urine output is not a reliable measurement of renal injury, either. During surgery it is common to administer diuretics which influence urine output independent of renal damage. Neither of these measures are prognostic, which precludes the prevention of the injury. Thus, researchers are investigating novel biomarkers that are renal specific and can monitor AKI risk in real time. Some researchers are focused on identifying chemical biomarkers to diagnose AKI more effectively. However, their use is limited due to cost and time. Preliminary studies have also shown that urine oxygen concentration may be a physiological biomarker that can be used to monitor AKI risk in real time. Urine oxygen concentration may reflect tissue oxygen concentration in the medullary region of the kidney. This measurement is affected by oxygen exchange between urine and the urinary tract tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between urine flow rate and the performance of a novel device to monitor AKI risk in real time. The results from this study suggest that is possible to monitor oxygen concentration non-invasively and that as the urine flow rate increases the performance of the device improves.