Session

session2

Location

Space Dynamics Laboratory, Auditorium Rm B

Start Date

5-9-2022 9:15 AM

End Date

5-9-2022 9:25 AM

Description

The integration of nanomaterials with additive manufacturing, a.k.a. 3D printing, can enable the creation of complex architecture with tunable functional properties.[1] As discussed in our review paper,[1] particles can be patterned or assembled with a broad range of forces during the printing process to impart specific functionalities in an otherwise passive structure. For example, a magnetic field can be leveraged to program the local magnetic remanence of a printed ferromagnetic composite. Magnetic programming can enable the fabrication of biocompatible materials with high energy density, which have promising applications in magnetically actuated biomedical robots. For example, a wireless ingestible soft robot can potentially perform diagnosis, biopsy and drug delivery into an otherwise unreachable region in the gastrointestinal tract, which can be useful in space missions where medical resources and personnel are limited.

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May 9th, 9:15 AM May 9th, 9:25 AM

Heat Management for Electromagnetic 3D Printing

Space Dynamics Laboratory, Auditorium Rm B

The integration of nanomaterials with additive manufacturing, a.k.a. 3D printing, can enable the creation of complex architecture with tunable functional properties.[1] As discussed in our review paper,[1] particles can be patterned or assembled with a broad range of forces during the printing process to impart specific functionalities in an otherwise passive structure. For example, a magnetic field can be leveraged to program the local magnetic remanence of a printed ferromagnetic composite. Magnetic programming can enable the fabrication of biocompatible materials with high energy density, which have promising applications in magnetically actuated biomedical robots. For example, a wireless ingestible soft robot can potentially perform diagnosis, biopsy and drug delivery into an otherwise unreachable region in the gastrointestinal tract, which can be useful in space missions where medical resources and personnel are limited.