Session

2023 poster session

Location

Weber State University

Start Date

5-8-2023 10:00 AM

Description

Bioluminescence is a fascinating capability that has benefited society in a number of ways. One way bioluminescence has been used is in the medical field, where researchers use it to mark cancer cells in animal models. However, bioluminescence could be harnessed for another application. In this project, we will generate bioluminescent E.coli that can produce unnatural amounts of light. These auto-bioluminescent bacteria could rival NASA low activity lights on shuttles, that produce 20 to 300 lux of light. To achieve the minimum of 20 lux in a liquid culture of E.coli, we must first introduce a plasmid that contains the genetic information for the proteins, luciferase and luciferin. Once the culture is auto-bioluminescent, we can use circular permutation, through artificially engineered mutations to modify a protein called Venus. Venus (a yellow fluorescent protein) can be fused with the C-terminus of the LuxB protein. The luxB gene codes for Alkanal monooxygenase which would allow a higher yield of light emission.

Available for download on Wednesday, May 08, 2024

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

The Bio-Light; Increasing Auto-Bioluminescence

Weber State University

Bioluminescence is a fascinating capability that has benefited society in a number of ways. One way bioluminescence has been used is in the medical field, where researchers use it to mark cancer cells in animal models. However, bioluminescence could be harnessed for another application. In this project, we will generate bioluminescent E.coli that can produce unnatural amounts of light. These auto-bioluminescent bacteria could rival NASA low activity lights on shuttles, that produce 20 to 300 lux of light. To achieve the minimum of 20 lux in a liquid culture of E.coli, we must first introduce a plasmid that contains the genetic information for the proteins, luciferase and luciferin. Once the culture is auto-bioluminescent, we can use circular permutation, through artificially engineered mutations to modify a protein called Venus. Venus (a yellow fluorescent protein) can be fused with the C-terminus of the LuxB protein. The luxB gene codes for Alkanal monooxygenase which would allow a higher yield of light emission.