Title

The Effect of General and task-Specific Self-Instruction on the Rate of Correct Addition Problems with Mentally Retarded Children

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Education and Treatment of Children

Volume

5

Issue

2

Publication Date

1982

First Page

121

Last Page

132

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of self-instructions on math performance of moderately mentally retarded elementary school children. The self-instruction package included training students to make statements directed toward general work habits (e.g., "Remember to work slowly and carefully." and "Keep your eyes on your paper."), as well as taskspecific statements (e.g., "Which is the biggest number?" and "Write the biggest number and put marks next to it for the other number."). The experimental conditions, conducted in the context of a multiple baseline design across students, resulted in meaningful increases in the rate of correctly performed math problems for three of the four students. The findings are discussed in terms of their practicality for classroom application and in relation to current research issues.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS