June 9, 2016

Event Title

Demonstrating Dialogue: Using the ACRL Framework to Teach Scholarship as a Conversation

Presenter Information

Sarah LeMire, Texas A&M University

Start Date

6-9-2016 11:15 AM

End Date

6-9-2016 12:15 PM

Description

The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education employs scholarship as conversation as a metaphor to describe the dynamic development of scholarly discourse over time. Many standard methods for teaching information discovery may encourage students to see scholarly work as static and universal, a position that prevents them from recognizing the evolving nature of this conversation and understanding the importance of practicing how to engage in it. In this presentation, we suggest strategies for using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame to design lesson plans, active learning activities and assignments that encourage students to understand literature in scholarly disciplines as a series of overlapping knowledge claims. We demonstrate ways to encourage students to frame their own scholarly inquiry as a response to these claims. Join us for a lively discussion as we suggest strategies for using this frame to invigorate the ways we teach students to engage in scholarship.

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Jun 9th, 11:15 AM Jun 9th, 12:15 PM

Demonstrating Dialogue: Using the ACRL Framework to Teach Scholarship as a Conversation

The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education employs scholarship as conversation as a metaphor to describe the dynamic development of scholarly discourse over time. Many standard methods for teaching information discovery may encourage students to see scholarly work as static and universal, a position that prevents them from recognizing the evolving nature of this conversation and understanding the importance of practicing how to engage in it. In this presentation, we suggest strategies for using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame to design lesson plans, active learning activities and assignments that encourage students to understand literature in scholarly disciplines as a series of overlapping knowledge claims. We demonstrate ways to encourage students to frame their own scholarly inquiry as a response to these claims. Join us for a lively discussion as we suggest strategies for using this frame to invigorate the ways we teach students to engage in scholarship.