Session

Technical Session I: Mission Payloads

SSC10-I-9.pdf (5378 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

Bridger Photonics and Montana State University have pioneered the active stabilization and control of highly-power efficient, extremely broadband swept laser sources for novel laser radar (LADAR) systems. By using a stretched processing technique similar to that of microwave radar, an FMCW LADAR system has numerous advantages that can help break the insertion barrier for LADAR-based sensors on small satellites (small-sats). These advantages include: (a) their extreme sensitivity allowing very low return light levels, (b) their capability to deliver extremely high down-range resolution using low-bandwidth receiver electronics, (c) their high electrical power efficiencies, (d) their compact, robust packaging and (e) their flexibility to perform a variety of advanced missions. The team has recently demonstrated the highest resolution LADAR measurements in the world (sub-50 microns) with range precisions on the nanometer scale. Examples of 3D imagery are also shown and a discussion of the future opportunities for sensors enabled by these novel sources and the FMCW approach is provided.

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Aug 9th, 4:44 PM

Ultra-Compact LADAR Systems for Next Generation Space Missions

Bridger Photonics and Montana State University have pioneered the active stabilization and control of highly-power efficient, extremely broadband swept laser sources for novel laser radar (LADAR) systems. By using a stretched processing technique similar to that of microwave radar, an FMCW LADAR system has numerous advantages that can help break the insertion barrier for LADAR-based sensors on small satellites (small-sats). These advantages include: (a) their extreme sensitivity allowing very low return light levels, (b) their capability to deliver extremely high down-range resolution using low-bandwidth receiver electronics, (c) their high electrical power efficiencies, (d) their compact, robust packaging and (e) their flexibility to perform a variety of advanced missions. The team has recently demonstrated the highest resolution LADAR measurements in the world (sub-50 microns) with range precisions on the nanometer scale. Examples of 3D imagery are also shown and a discussion of the future opportunities for sensors enabled by these novel sources and the FMCW approach is provided.