Title

Halogeton (H. Glomeratus) Poisoning in Cattle: Case Report

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

International Journal of Poisonous Plant Research

Volume

3

Issue

1

Publisher

Research Gate

Publication Date

4-1-2014

First Page

23

Last Page

26

Abstract

Historically, the most significant losses from halogeton poisoning have been reported in sheep, with multiple catastrophic deaths documented. While recorded death losses in cattle from halogeton poisoning are less common than in sheep, recent cases, including 2 reported here, and anecdotal reports from other ranchers suggest that the impact of halogeton losses in cattle herds in the western United States is much more widespread than originally thought. Halogeton may accumulate up to 30% oxalates; a small amount of the plant (300 g) is enough to cause death in sheep. Oxalates precipitate calcium from the blood, resulting in hypocalcemia, formation of calcium oxalate crystals, and uremia. In this report, 2 cases of halogeton poisoning in cattle are documented, including a history of halogeton grazing, supportive oxalate analysis of plants collected from the poisoning locations, and histological evidence of classic oxalate nephropathy and calcium oxalate crystal nephrosis.

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