Bark beetle outbreaks have resulted in the loss of hundreds of thousands of conifers on approximately 30 million hectares of forested lands in western North America during the last decade. Many forests remain susceptible to bark beetle infestation and will continue to experience high levels of conifer mortality until suitable host trees are depleted, or natural factors cause populations to collapse. Stand conditions and drought, combined with warming temperatures, have contributed to the severity of these outbreaks, particularly in high-elevation forests.

Conventional wisdom suggests that large scale bark beetle outbreaks alter fuel complexes resulting in an increased potential for severe fires. Conversely, fires damage trees that may predispose them to bark beetle attack. In reality there is little specific quantified data supporting these assertions, and until recently, relationships between fire and western bark beetles in forests of North America have not been extensively studied. The magnitude of recent outbreaks and large wildfires has resulted in a flurry of research attempting to quantify bark beetle/fire/fuel interactions.
 
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2018

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Visitor Preferences for Visual Changes in Bark Beetle-Impacted Forest Recreation Settings in the United States and Germany, Arne Arnberger, Martin Ebenberger, Ingrid E. Schneider, Stuart Cottrell, Alexander A. Snyder, Eick von Ruschkowski, Robert C. Venette, Stephanie A. Snyder, and Paul H. Gobster; Environmental Management

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Historical and Event-Based Bioclimatic Suitability Predict Regional Forest Vulnerability to Compound Effects of Severe Drought and Bark Beetle Infestation, F Lloret and T Kitzberger; Global Change Biology

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Bark Beetles as Agents of Change in Social–Ecological Systems, Jesse L. Morris, Stuart Cottrell, Christopher J. Fettig, Justin R. DeRose, Katherine M. Mattor, Vachel A. Carter, Jennifer Clear, Jessica Clement, Winslow D. Hansen, Jeffrey A. Hicke, Philip E. Higuera, Alistair WR Seddon, Heikki Seppä, Rosemary L. Sherriff, John D. stednick, and Steven J. Seybold; Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

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Bark Beetle-Induced Tree Mortality Alters Stand Energy Budgets Due to Water Budget Changes, David E. Reed, Brent E. Ewers, Elise Pendall, John Frank, and Robert Kelly; Theoretical and Applied Climatology

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Colonization of Weakened Trees by Mass-Attacking Bark Beetles: No Penalty for Pioneers, Scattered Initial Distributions and Final Regular Patterns, Ettienne Toffin, Edith Gabriel, Marceau Louis, Jean Louis Deneubourg, and Jeane Claude Gregoire; Royal Society Open Science

2017

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Forest Response to Water Availability and Disturbance in the Western United States, Logan T. Berner

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Tree Mortality from Fires, Bark Beetles, and Timber Harvest During a Hot and Dry Decade in the Western United States (2003–2012), Logan T. Berner, Beverly E. Law, Arjan JH Meddens, and Jeffrey A. Hicke; Environmental Research Letters

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Effects of Elevation and Aspect on the Flight Activity of Two Alien Pine Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Recently-harvested Pine Forests, E. G. Brockerhoff, F. Chinellatoa, M. Faccolia, M. Kimberleyc, and S. M. Pawsona; Forest Ecology and Management

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Climate Drivers of Bark Beetle Outbreak Dynamics in Norway Spruce Forests, Lorenzo Marini, Bjørn Økland, Anna Maria Jönsson, Barbara Bentz, Allan Carroll, Beat Forster, Jean Claude Grégoire, Rainer Hurling, Louis Michel Nageleisen, Sigrid Netherer, Hans Peter Ravn, Aaron Weed, and Martin Schroeder; Ecography

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Interactions Among Fuel Management, Species Composition, Bark Beetles, and Climate Change and the Potential Effects on Forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin, Robert M. Scheller, Alec M. Ktretchun, E Louise Loudermilk, Matther D. Hurteau, Peter J. Weisberg, and Carl Skinner; Ecosystems

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Climate Change Amplifies the Interactions Between Wind and Bark Beetle Disturbances in Forest Landscapes, Rupert Seidl and Werner Rammer; Landscape Ecology

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Fires Following Bark Beetles: Factors Controlling Severity and Disturbance Interactions in Ponderosa Pine, Carolyn H. Sieg, Rodman R. Linn, Francois Pimont, Chad M. Hoffman, Joel D. McMillan, Judith Winterkamp, and L Scott Baggett; Fire Ecology

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Severity of a Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak Across a Range of Stand Conditions in Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado, United States, Anthony G. Vorster, Paul H. Evangelista, Thomas J. Stonlgren, Sunil Kumara, Charles C. Rhoades, Robert M. Hubbard, Antony S. Cheng, and Kelly Elder; Forest Ecology and Management

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The Influence of Forest Management Systems on the Abundance and Diversity of Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Commercial Plantations of Sitka Spruce, David T. Williams, Nigel Straw, Nick Fielding, Martin Jukes, and John Price; Forest Ecology and Management

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On the Structural and Species Diversity Effects of Bark Beetle Disturbance in Forests During Initial and Advanced Early-Seral Stages at Different Scales, Maria Barbara Winter, Claus Bässler, Markus Bernhardt Römermann, Franz Sebastian Krah, Hanno Schaefer, Sebastian Seibold, and Jörg Müler; European Journal of Forest Research

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Novel Forest Decline Triggered by Multiple Interactions Among Climate, an Introduced Pathogen and Bark Beetles, Carmen M. Wong and Lori D. Daniels; Global Change Biology

2016

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Fire Severity and Cumulative Disturbance Effects in the Post-mountain Pine Beetle Lodgepole Pine Forests of the Pole Creek Fire, Michelle C. Agne, Travis Woolley, and Stephen Fitzgerald; Forest Ecology and Management

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The Influence of Variation in Host Tree Monoterpene Composition on Secondary Attraction by an Invasive Bark Beetle: Implications for Range Expansion and Potential Host Shift by the Mountain Pine Beetle, Jordan L. Burke and Allan L. Carroll; Forest Ecology and Management

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Using Structural Sustainability for Forest Health Monitoring and Triage: Case Study of a Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)-impacted Landscape, Jonathan A. Cale, Jennifer G. Klutsch, Nadir Erilgin, José F. Negrón, and John D. Castelloc; Ecological Indicators

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Long-Distance Dispersal of Non-Native Pine Bark Beetles From Host Resources, Kevin D. Chase, Dave Kelly, Andrew M. Liebhold, Martin K. F Bader, and Eckehard G. Brockerhoff; Ecological Entomology

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Bark Beetle Effects on a Seven-Century Chronosequence of Engelmann Spruce and Subalpine Fir in Colorado, USA, Drew P. Derderian, Haishan Dang, Gregory H. Alpet, and Dan Binkley; Forest Ecology and Management

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Aftermath of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in British Columbia: Stand Dynamics, Management Response and Ecosystem Resilience, Amalesh Dhar, Lael Parrott, and Christopher D. B. Hawkins; Forests

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Forest-Landscape Structure Mediates Effects of a Spruce Bark Beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) Outbreak on Subsequent Likelihood of Burning in Alaskan Boreal Forest, Winslow D. Hansen, F. Stuart Chapin, Helen T. Naughton, T. Scott Rupp, and David Verbyla; Forest Ecology and Management

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Recent Tree Mortality in the Western United States from Bark Beetles and Forest Fires, Jeffrey A. Hicke, Arjan J. H. Meddens, and Crystal A. Kolden; Forest Science

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Evaluating Crown Fire Rate of Spread Predictions From Physics-based Models, C. M. Hoffman, J. Canfield, R. R. Linn, W. Mell, C. H. Sieg, F. Pimon, and J. Ziegler; Fire Technology