Title

Phonological Awareness, Reading Fluency, and Strategy-Based Reading Comprehension Instruction for Children with Language Learning Disabilities: What Does Research Show?

Authors

S. Laing

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, Division 1

Volume

13

Issue

1

Publisher

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Publication Date

2006

First Page

17

Last Page

22

Abstract

To be a proficient reader you must possess automatic word recognition and be able to comprehend what you read. Automatic word recognition is the ability to recognize words quickly and easily with little effort so that you can direct your attention to the literal and often inferential meanings that the author is trying to convey. For many children, the road to proficient reading is fraught with obstacles. These barriers include difficulty with phonological awareness, developing fluency in word recognition, understanding the meaning of words and complex sentence structures, and using strategies to comprehend what is read. Typically developing children experience fewer road blocks on the course to skilled reading and respond well to interventions designed to remove academic hurdles from their paths. Children with language and learning problems also benefit from instruction, but not always in the same way as children who are developing typically. Thus, interventions geared toward children with language and learning problems should be designed with their learning styles and needs in mind.

Comments

Originally published by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Subscription required to access article fulltext.

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