Date of Award:

1-1-1968

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Wildland Resources

Advisor/Chair:

George B. Coltharp

Abstract

During 1966 and 1967, a range plant clipping study was conducted at two locations in central Utah's Ephraim Canyon. It was found that extreme clipping treatment resulted in a significant increase in soil moisture due to a presumed decrease in transpiration during 1967. At the lower location, 7,100 feet elevation, a difference of 5.4 inches over a 5 foot soil profile was noted between the extreme and control clipping treatments in 1967. At the upper location, 10,000 feet in elevation, a savings of 3.6 inches soil moisture was observed over the 5 foot soil profile in 1967. Other clipping intensities also showed water savings in terms of reduced depletion values over the control plots, although these differences were not in all cases statistically significant.

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