Title

Observed Parenting Practices of First-Generation Latino Families

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Journal of Community Psychology

Volume

34

Issue

2

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Publication Date

2006

First Page

133

Last Page

148

DOI

10.1002/jcop.20088

Abstract

This study used an established behavioral observation methodology to examine the parenting practices of first-generation Latino parents of children 4 to 9 years of age. The study had three central aims, to examine: (1) the feasibility of using a behavioral observation methodology with Spanish-speaking immigrant families, (2) the utility of the Parent Peer Process Code (PPPC; Forgatch, Knutson, & Mayne, 1992) for coding parentñchild interactions, and (3) the relationship between observed parenting practices, as coded with the PPPC, and child outcomes. Families consisted of 48 fathers, 49 mothers, and 50 children. Families participated in cooperative, problem-solving, and skillsbuilding tasks. The authors coded in five broad categories: problem solving, skills building, positive involvement, effective discipline, and monitoring. Findings show that the behavioral observation methodology is feasible to use with Spanish-speaking immigrant families, that the PPPC is useful in understanding parentñchild interactions, and that the coded parentñchild interactions predict differential child outcomes. This information can help inform the development or adaptation of culturally sensitive parenting interventions to this underserved population.

Comments

Originally published by Wiley-Blackwell. Publisher's PDF available through remote link.

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