Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Professional Psychology: Research and Practice

Volume

40

Issue

4

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Publication Date

8-1-2009

First Page

361

Last Page

368

DOI

10.1037/a0016401

Abstract

There is a growing interest in whether and how to adapt psychotherapies to take into account the cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic context of diverse ethnocultural groups. At the root of the debate is theissue of whether evidence-based treatments (EBTs) developed within a particular linguistic and cultural context are appropriate for ethnocultural groups that do not share the same language, cultural values, or both. There is considerable evidence that culture and context influence almost every aspect of the diagnostic and treatment process. Yet, there are concerns about fidelity of interventions, and some have questioned whether tinkering with well-established EBTs is warranted. We present arguments in favor of the cultural compatibility and universalistic hypotheses. Next, we review the available published frameworks for cultural adaptations of EBTs and offer examples from the literature on the process and outcome of different approaches used. Conceptual models for adapting existing interventions and emerging evidence that adapted intervention leads to positive outcomes suggest that there are tools for engaging in evidence-based psychological practices with ethnocultural youth. Recommendations for future directions are provided.

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