Title

Incidence of Nonverbal Learning Disability in a High School Anger Management Class

Document Type

Contribution to Book

Journal/Book Title/Conference

International Perspectives on Child & Adolescent Mental Health

Volume

2

Editor

NN Singh, TH Ollendick & AN Singh

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Date

2002

First Page

439

Last Page

447

Abstract

Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is a relatively new syndrome that is gaining increased attention in the educational and research literature. Rourke (1989) proposed a neuropsychological model in which NLD was conceptualized as a neurological syndrome believed to result from damage to the white matter connections in hte right hemisphere of the brain that is important for intermodal integration. The resulting developmental and clinical characteristics were later described in a study identifying the assets and deficits found in persons with NLD (Harnadek & Rourke, 1994). Deficits have been noted in motor skills, visual-spatial skills, and social skills with accompanying assets in verbal skills and auditory memory with higher Verbal IQ compared to Performance IQ on tests of cognitive abilities (Rourke, Dietrich, & Young, 1973; Thompson, 1997).

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