Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Extreme UltraViolet Spectral Distribution's Effect on Ion Generation

Presenter Information

Maggie LewisFollow

Class

Article

Department

Physics

Faculty Mentor

Jan Sojka

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is one of three instruments on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and provides an observation of solar irradiance, the major source of the mid-latitude dayside ionosphere. Measurements from EVE are then used in USU's Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) to generate a simulation of the ionosphere. The 0.1 to 7 nm wavelength range is detected by EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) and the measurement presented as an integration of the total energy for that wavelength band. Previously, the TDIM employed an even binning mechanism which divided this energy evenly over seven 1nm bins. This, however, is not reflective of the actual distribution generated by the sun. The ionosphere's E-region is most strongly affected by this uncertainty which leads to differences of over 100%. These differences affect radio communications especially at high latitudes. This study examines the wavelength dependence on ionosphere generation as well as explores other, more accurate, binning schemes.

Start Date

4-9-2015 2:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 2:00 PM

Extreme UltraViolet Spectral Distribution's Effect on Ion Generation

The Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is one of three instruments on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and provides an observation of solar irradiance, the major source of the mid-latitude dayside ionosphere. Measurements from EVE are then used in USU's Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) to generate a simulation of the ionosphere. The 0.1 to 7 nm wavelength range is detected by EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) and the measurement presented as an integration of the total energy for that wavelength band. Previously, the TDIM employed an even binning mechanism which divided this energy evenly over seven 1nm bins. This, however, is not reflective of the actual distribution generated by the sun. The ionosphere's E-region is most strongly affected by this uncertainty which leads to differences of over 100%. These differences affect radio communications especially at high latitudes. This study examines the wavelength dependence on ionosphere generation as well as explores other, more accurate, binning schemes.