Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Expressions of affinial kinship and social support among high school extracurricular activities

Presenter Information

Erica HawvermaleFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology Department

Faculty Mentor

Travis Dorsch

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The present descriptive research highlights the social networks and support systems in high school extracurricular activities and how they arise. Phase I of the research was designed to assess the differences in sense of community among different forms of high school extracurricualrs: competitive groups (e.g., athletic teams, marching band); performance groups (e.g., choir, orchestra); and participatory groups (e.g., language clubs, science clubs). A total of 701 students completed surveys tapping student perceptions of sense of community, commitment, and enjoyment in their respective activities. Students who participated in performance groups had significantly lower sense of community scores than members of competitive and participatory groups. This is likely due to the compulsory nature of the entry level groups included in the sample; students who take these classes because they are mandatory to graduate may not do so because they are committed to or enjoy their activity. Phase II of the research was designed to assess student perceptions of the development of sense of community among group members. A subsample of 18 students from Phase I participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and cross-checked for accuracy, then coded thematically using MAXQDA. Analyses suggest that many students have feelings of pride when their group works toward or accomplishes a common goal. Additionally, many students likened their group to a family, ascribing kinship terms to coaches, faculty, and peers. Participants also expressed feelings of trust towards both their instructors and their peers, stating that they'd be willing to go to either if they had personal problems. Despite these general findings, stark differences arise between higher- and lower-level groups within the same school, particularly when students perceive favoritism by the instructor, or when a significant number of students are involved in a sub-group, leaving a smaller proportion out of the activity or event.

Location

Room 421

Start Date

4-13-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 2:45 PM

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Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Expressions of affinial kinship and social support among high school extracurricular activities

Room 421

The present descriptive research highlights the social networks and support systems in high school extracurricular activities and how they arise. Phase I of the research was designed to assess the differences in sense of community among different forms of high school extracurricualrs: competitive groups (e.g., athletic teams, marching band); performance groups (e.g., choir, orchestra); and participatory groups (e.g., language clubs, science clubs). A total of 701 students completed surveys tapping student perceptions of sense of community, commitment, and enjoyment in their respective activities. Students who participated in performance groups had significantly lower sense of community scores than members of competitive and participatory groups. This is likely due to the compulsory nature of the entry level groups included in the sample; students who take these classes because they are mandatory to graduate may not do so because they are committed to or enjoy their activity. Phase II of the research was designed to assess student perceptions of the development of sense of community among group members. A subsample of 18 students from Phase I participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and cross-checked for accuracy, then coded thematically using MAXQDA. Analyses suggest that many students have feelings of pride when their group works toward or accomplishes a common goal. Additionally, many students likened their group to a family, ascribing kinship terms to coaches, faculty, and peers. Participants also expressed feelings of trust towards both their instructors and their peers, stating that they'd be willing to go to either if they had personal problems. Despite these general findings, stark differences arise between higher- and lower-level groups within the same school, particularly when students perceive favoritism by the instructor, or when a significant number of students are involved in a sub-group, leaving a smaller proportion out of the activity or event.