Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Financial strain, employment, and subjective stressors over time among caregivers of individuals with dementia

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

Yin Liu

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This study examined how financial strain and employment impact subjective stress over 12 months in 184 family caregivers of individuals with dementia. Subjective stressors of role overload, role captivity, and employment status were measured at baseline, 6-, and 12-months. Self reports on financial insufficiency were measured at baseline only. Growth curve analyses were conducted to examine within-person changes in subjective stress of caregiving and associations with employment and financial strains. The findings showed that caregivers with greater financial strain at baseline had higher levels of overload and increasing captivity longitudinally. Although caregivers who were consistently unemployed reported lower role overload, they also had steeper increase over time than those who consistently worked. To conclude, while a caregiver’s perception of financial strain does add to the long-term stress of the role, his or her employment outside the home may have complex associations with feelings of stress over time.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Financial strain, employment, and subjective stressors over time among caregivers of individuals with dementia

The South Atrium

This study examined how financial strain and employment impact subjective stress over 12 months in 184 family caregivers of individuals with dementia. Subjective stressors of role overload, role captivity, and employment status were measured at baseline, 6-, and 12-months. Self reports on financial insufficiency were measured at baseline only. Growth curve analyses were conducted to examine within-person changes in subjective stress of caregiving and associations with employment and financial strains. The findings showed that caregivers with greater financial strain at baseline had higher levels of overload and increasing captivity longitudinally. Although caregivers who were consistently unemployed reported lower role overload, they also had steeper increase over time than those who consistently worked. To conclude, while a caregiver’s perception of financial strain does add to the long-term stress of the role, his or her employment outside the home may have complex associations with feelings of stress over time.