Event Title

Water system water and energy linkages and implications for household and city-scale systems modeling

Presenter Information

Adel Abdallah

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-30-2011 11:10 AM

End Date

3-30-2011 11:15 AM

Description

This poster presents the water and energy linkages in urban water supply systems with particular focus at both the city and the residential end use scales. At the city scale, analysis has been done on a variety of water supply systems in the U.S. and across the world to identify and compare the energy (electricity) required to 1) extract, convey, and treat bulk source water, 2) distribute treated water to customers, and 3) collect, treat and dispose of wastewater. The analysis reveals that the energy intensity (kilowatt hour/million gallons [KWh/MG] for water supply systems varies widely from 820 to 12,700 KWh/MG depending on the water source type (surface or groundwater), quality, distance from demand location, city topography, wastewater effluent standards, and treatment technology. The analysis shows that overlooking the water-energy linkages in water supply decisions may lead to very high energy intensity like in Southern California where water is conveyed hundreds of miles and with huge pumping lifts from both northern California and the Colorado River to the demand location. At the household scale, we are investigating the range of behavioral (use frequency and duration), demographical (household size), and technological (use volume or flowrate) factors that affect residential water uses and therefore energy consumption though hot water use in the showerhead, laundry machine, dishwasher, and faucet. We are also considering the energy embedded to extract, treat, convey, and distribute water for toilet flushing and to irrigate outdoor landscaping. The analysis is being made with detailed, disaggregated end use data that was previously collected by the USEPA as part of a retrofit study of 100 single family households in Seattle WA, Oakland CA, and Tampa FL between the period from 2000 and 2003. We will use household and city scale energy-water data to build a simulation optimization model that seeks to minimize costs for water, energy, and retrofits at the household and city scales while meeting specified conservation targets. The model decision variables are to select and size water conservation actions targeted to particular residential end uses. The model also is subject to constraints of water use, energy use, and financial budgets to implement conservation measures. The simulation/optimization model will allow water mangers to better quantify water, energy, and money saved from water conservation actions and select and size these actions.

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Mar 30th, 11:10 AM Mar 30th, 11:15 AM

Water system water and energy linkages and implications for household and city-scale systems modeling

Eccles Conference Center

This poster presents the water and energy linkages in urban water supply systems with particular focus at both the city and the residential end use scales. At the city scale, analysis has been done on a variety of water supply systems in the U.S. and across the world to identify and compare the energy (electricity) required to 1) extract, convey, and treat bulk source water, 2) distribute treated water to customers, and 3) collect, treat and dispose of wastewater. The analysis reveals that the energy intensity (kilowatt hour/million gallons [KWh/MG] for water supply systems varies widely from 820 to 12,700 KWh/MG depending on the water source type (surface or groundwater), quality, distance from demand location, city topography, wastewater effluent standards, and treatment technology. The analysis shows that overlooking the water-energy linkages in water supply decisions may lead to very high energy intensity like in Southern California where water is conveyed hundreds of miles and with huge pumping lifts from both northern California and the Colorado River to the demand location. At the household scale, we are investigating the range of behavioral (use frequency and duration), demographical (household size), and technological (use volume or flowrate) factors that affect residential water uses and therefore energy consumption though hot water use in the showerhead, laundry machine, dishwasher, and faucet. We are also considering the energy embedded to extract, treat, convey, and distribute water for toilet flushing and to irrigate outdoor landscaping. The analysis is being made with detailed, disaggregated end use data that was previously collected by the USEPA as part of a retrofit study of 100 single family households in Seattle WA, Oakland CA, and Tampa FL between the period from 2000 and 2003. We will use household and city scale energy-water data to build a simulation optimization model that seeks to minimize costs for water, energy, and retrofits at the household and city scales while meeting specified conservation targets. The model decision variables are to select and size water conservation actions targeted to particular residential end uses. The model also is subject to constraints of water use, energy use, and financial budgets to implement conservation measures. The simulation/optimization model will allow water mangers to better quantify water, energy, and money saved from water conservation actions and select and size these actions.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2011/Posters/19