Location

Virtual

Start Date

5-10-2021 9:25 AM

End Date

5-10-2021 9:35 AM

Description

Utah Lake is a unique and valuable natural resource in the semi-arid Utah Valley. Shallow, turbid, eutrophic, and slightly saline, the lake degrades and stabilizes pollution well [1]. The lake is a highly productive ecosystem and provides ecological habitats, water storage, and recreation. Detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs), however, has closed Utah Lake beaches every summer since 2016 [2] and raised concerns over the health of the lake ecosystem [3, 4]. HABs, which involve excessive algal growth that can cause hypoxic and/or toxic water conditions [5], have numerous detrimental effects [6] on lakes and reservoirs in the United States and throughout the world [7, 8]. They are most prevalent during warm periods, and studies indicate that global climate change could be a catalyst for these blooms [8, 9] as lake and reservoir surface temperatures increase [10, 11]. Utah Lake experiences intense blooms with severe consequences for recreational revenue and downstream agriculture.

Available for download on Tuesday, May 10, 2022

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May 10th, 9:25 AM May 10th, 9:35 AM

Long-Term Spatiotemporal Monitoring and Analysis of Chlorophyll-a Concentrations in Utah Lake

Virtual

Utah Lake is a unique and valuable natural resource in the semi-arid Utah Valley. Shallow, turbid, eutrophic, and slightly saline, the lake degrades and stabilizes pollution well [1]. The lake is a highly productive ecosystem and provides ecological habitats, water storage, and recreation. Detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs), however, has closed Utah Lake beaches every summer since 2016 [2] and raised concerns over the health of the lake ecosystem [3, 4]. HABs, which involve excessive algal growth that can cause hypoxic and/or toxic water conditions [5], have numerous detrimental effects [6] on lakes and reservoirs in the United States and throughout the world [7, 8]. They are most prevalent during warm periods, and studies indicate that global climate change could be a catalyst for these blooms [8, 9] as lake and reservoir surface temperatures increase [10, 11]. Utah Lake experiences intense blooms with severe consequences for recreational revenue and downstream agriculture.