Session

Session 4 2022

Start Date

10-26-2022 12:00 AM

Abstract

Design of stilling basins for the dissipation of energy has been established by the seminal tests developed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, by mid XX century. Such designs basically include blocks and end sills, dentated or complete. However, those designs need variations in desertic zones, where the end sill is not allowed due to self-cleaning purposes, and no “drop” is possible for the same reason. In the case of the outlet structure for Perris Dam, located in the Riverside County, California, the design of the stilling basin was optimized using a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) approach, and a physical model. Potential overspill due to unsteady oscillations of the free surface and energy dissipation were studied using a Volume of Fluid (VoF) method combined with a RANS turbulence closure, and then validated with a physical model. The combination of powerful numerical simulations with experimental models allows for an efficient analysis and design of complex hydraulic structures. The cheaper numerical simulations provide an accurate description of the flow that can be used to test several geometries and evaluate the most suited one to be represented on the physical model. From this first stage, an optimized geometry is implemented in a physical model which is used to calibrate and validate the numerical simulations as well as to optimize the geometries obtained from the numerical model. The new proposed structure promoted a high level of dissipation and a design that reduce the maintenance issues associated with desertic regions.

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Oct 26th, 12:00 AM

Preliminary Evaluation and Design of a New Energy Dissipation Stilling Basin via Numerical and Experimental Modeling

Design of stilling basins for the dissipation of energy has been established by the seminal tests developed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, by mid XX century. Such designs basically include blocks and end sills, dentated or complete. However, those designs need variations in desertic zones, where the end sill is not allowed due to self-cleaning purposes, and no “drop” is possible for the same reason. In the case of the outlet structure for Perris Dam, located in the Riverside County, California, the design of the stilling basin was optimized using a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) approach, and a physical model. Potential overspill due to unsteady oscillations of the free surface and energy dissipation were studied using a Volume of Fluid (VoF) method combined with a RANS turbulence closure, and then validated with a physical model. The combination of powerful numerical simulations with experimental models allows for an efficient analysis and design of complex hydraulic structures. The cheaper numerical simulations provide an accurate description of the flow that can be used to test several geometries and evaluate the most suited one to be represented on the physical model. From this first stage, an optimized geometry is implemented in a physical model which is used to calibrate and validate the numerical simulations as well as to optimize the geometries obtained from the numerical model. The new proposed structure promoted a high level of dissipation and a design that reduce the maintenance issues associated with desertic regions.